Media społecznościowe, komunikacja naukowa i akademicki superużytkownik w Wielkiej Brytanii

Yimei Zhu, Kingsley Purdam

Abstrakt


Internet i narzędzia oferowane przez media społecznościowe otworzyły nowe możliwości dla otwartej nauki, wliczając w to bardziej interaktywną komunikację i udostępnianie danych badawczych. Wyniki naszych badań, oparte na danych z wywiadów oraz ankiety przeprowadzonej wśród naukowców uniwersyteckich w Wielkiej Brytanii, sugerują, że większość badaczy docenia wartość i znaczenie zwiększenia komunikacji w obrębie otwartej nauki i udostępniania danych, lecz obawia się potencjalnych zagrożeń. Niewielka grupa, którą można określić mianem superużytkowników, regularnie udostępnia nowe informacje na temat prowadzonych przez siebie badań. Nie ulega wątpliwości, że możliwości rozwoju otwartej nauki i zaangażowania społecznego wciąż wzrastają, jednak związane z tym trudności pozostają aktualne.

Słowa kluczowe


otwarta nauka, współpraca, kanały komunikacyjne, zaangażowanie, własność intelektualna, media społecznościowe, otwarte dane, komunikacja naukowa, publikacje naukowe, prace naukowe, badania ankietowe, pracownicy naukowi, Wielka Brytania

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